The Secret of Healthy Sitting Posture

As a follow-up to the June Tip of the Month – the impact of incorrect sitting – Surgeon Dr. Gerd Schnack from the Sport and Prevention Center in Zug, Switzerland informs us about impingement on the neck, spine, hips, skeleton, joints, and related muscle groups.

Humans are made for walking and running, not sitting, according to his argument! While sitting per se is not the issue, doing so on the same chair and maintaining the same rigid position becomes problematic for joints – a cardinal mistake, according to Dr. Schnack! Yes, really! And, we tend to ignore the fact that the usual 10-12 hours per day spent sitting while eating, traveling in the car, sitting in the subway or bus, hunching over our laptop, and our endless texting habits become potential health risks.

The big problem with our sitting position is that supporting muscular structures of the neck and lower spine (lumbar column) have to endure constant strain and stress while the antagonist muscles of the lower back and hips remain unchallenged for a lengthy period of time. We not only damage the back due to our incorrect sitting posture but also lock the shoulders and hips into a rigid and stiff bent-over position. These muscles are then rarely stretched during sitting because the body adopts the bent or hunched position; and “we are actually convinced that our body is not going to ‘strike back with all that bad sitting’ when we deprive upper extremities and hip joints of the freedom of movement…(Dr. Schnack).”

He lists several reasons that prolonged sitting can damage our health:

  • Breastbones and ribcage become even more bent because the counter-movement/counter-swing is lacking. Consequently, the hip joints used in standing and walking can no longer open sufficiently, which can result in back pain.
  • It is a chronic (sustained) lack of movement, which is not only detrimental for the back but also the heart and circulation, thereby potentially shortening our lifespan.
  • It doubles the risk of heart and cardiovascular disease as well as diabetes.
  • It increases the risk of osteoarthritis and contributes to intervertebral disc damage.
  • It becomes a factor in weight gain because unused muscles degenerate, i.e., change into body fat but burn up less fat.
  • It contributes to body imbalance because especially the hip muscles (‘the filet mignon’ among muscles, as he calls it) are neglected. He considers these muscles as one of the most important for health.

Here, consider all the injuries especially athletes suffer (Schloder). Why? What exactly is so special about these muscles? For example, they control the pendulum swing of the lumbar spine and thereby regulate critical pressure exerted on the spinal disks. In addition, they are also important for our breathing and running function.

  • It has tremendous impact on the physiological function because the hip joints are bent at 90-degrees, and ‘signal muscle death of the iliopsoas’, according to Dr. Schnack; they shrink in the sustained flexed position although it is supposed to be responsible that we can bend and straighten the body. In order to do this, the muscle depends on the function of elastic fibers, which degenerate when not used or trained. Therefore, the hip muscles are inhibited.
  • It impedes the development of the fascia and iliopsoas, which is indispensable for our upright standing. It also becomes problematic for the small back because stressed hip muscles increase intradiscal pressure due to the exaggerated forward curvature of the lumbar spine, leading to the dreaded hyperlordosis (hollow rounded back, sway back – excessive inward curvature of the lumbar [lower] spine).

It is impossible to ban chairs and sitting from our lifestyle …but we can take measures to counteract our sitting habit in order to diminish body tension and improve the hip flexor. Here are his suggestions:

  • Get up every 30 minutes and incorporate several stretching exercises
  • Get up every 30 minutes and move about for 1-2 minutes
  • Get up every 30 minutes and lie down to stretch out – elevate the legs
  • Get up every 30 minutes – lie on floor – tuck up legs – wrap arms and hand around calves roll back on floor
  • Perform the ‘Stork-leg Ritual.’ Stretching is done in the sitting position because we can not effectively reach the facia-iliopsoas in the standing position with this exercise:

Assume sitting upright position on front edge of chair – hands grasping side edges of chair – place the L leg beneath the chair to the back – top of L foot on floor – L thigh and hip stretched to maximal – lift the R leg off the floor – shift the upper body to the back without arching the back – thigh and frontal abdominal wall are linear aligned – slightly bounce the upper body forward and backward in a dynamic position – repeat – opposite side/hip/leg/foot

Benefits of Correct Sitting Posture:

  • Foremost, back pain can be controlled better because the shift/re-positioning and equal distribution on the lumbar spine reduces intradiscal pressure, thereby reducing the risk of a herniated disc injury.
  • Our body appearance changes because we can move more easily. We walk more upright and more gracefully with good hip action instead of stomping along hunched over.

Note:

Dr. Gerd Schnack is a surgeon for Sport and Prevention at the Allensbacher Prevention Center, Zug, Switzerland.

Reference:

Schnack, G. (2018). Meine Gesundheit. Medizin Thema der Woche. Das Geheimnis des gesunden Sitzens. Gesundes Sitzen auf einem Stuhl – alles was Sie dabei beachten sollen [My health. Medical theme of the week. The secret of healthy sitting. Healthy sitting habits on a chair – everything you need to pay attention to], Das Neue Blatt #14. March 28, pp. 24-25, and www.DasNeue Blatt.de

Tip of the Month – June

Coach Monika says…

Correct and Incorrect Sitting – Things to Bear in Mind

Ever watch people in shopping malls or just walking about on the street, busy with their ‘tech gadgets’ oblivious to their surroundings? Medical reports have now identified serious health issues associated with the typical slumped posture adopted while scrolling.

I am concerned about this because our athletes are no different in their habits, but the effects of addictive behavior has more of an impact on their fitness and performance level. Previously, I wrote about neck soreness and pain linked to incorrect sitting posture while texting, working on the computer, or watching TV – the ‘I-pad neck syndrome’ as I call it.

Swiss surgeon, Dr. Gerd Schnack from the Sport and Prevention Center in Zug, Switzerland states that there are about 1000 sitting positions (!) but that people tend to select the unhealthiest ones and tend to remain in those for hours, which can be detrimental to our health. Refer to the June Newsletter for more details.

Diagram of correct and incorrect posture while sitting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Row

√ = L side – Correct Sitting Posture

  • Upright Posture – back straight – head aligned and looking forward (reason computer should be adjusted to eye level)
  • Slight forward pelvic tilt
  • Hips and knees at 90-degree angle
  • Legs slightly apart – feet slightly apart, flat on floor, and facing forward, which automatically places the body in upright position

X = R side – Incorrect Sitting

  • Body leans forward (slouching)
  • Restricts (confines) abdomen – contributes to sluggish activity of intestine
  • Restricts enzyme and lipid metabolism because production of important enzymes is inhibited in the abdominal muscles
  • Since the stomach area is ‘cramped’ because of incorrect sitting posture the intestine becomes sluggish, and the fat metabolism is obstructed. This is crucial because the abs contribute to the production of important enzymes.

Bottom Row

X = L side – Incorrect Sitting

  • Less than 2/3 of the thighs is placed on the seat of the chair – thigh muscles are over-strained – an upright sitting position is impossible

X = R side – Incorrect Sitting

  • Incorrect position of the feet – not placed fully and flat on the floor – leading to a tense body position, and stress on muscles and joints

Note:

Dr. Gerd Schnack is a surgeon for Sport and Prevention at the Allensbacher Prevention Center, Zug, Switzerland.

Reference:

Schnack, G. (2018). Meine Gesundheit. Medizin Thema der Woche. Das Geheimnis des gesunden Sitzens. Gesundes Sitzen auf einem Stuhl – alles was Sie dabei beachten sollen [My health. Medical theme of the week. The secret of healthy sitting. Healthy sitting habits on a chair – everything you need to pay attention to], Das Neue Blatt #14. March 28, pp. 24-25, and www.DasNeue Blatt.de

Tip of the Month – May

Coach Monika says…

 

Ever experienced neck tension, discomfort/soreness, or even pain after extended smartphone or laptop use? According to medical research, looking at your tablet with a tilted head, a most unfavourable position, leads to muscle tension and soreness in the shoulders and neck, as does prolonged sitting with incorrect posture. Massive tension in the upper back, shoulders, and neck region can lead to stress and persistent headaches.

Moreover, many sport activities utilize movement patterns with the upper body in the forward and convex position, which results in the ‘forward rounded shoulder syndrome’ or so-called ‘slouch position.’ Therefore, contra-indicated exercises (shoulder and upper body stretches) should be included in daily Warm-up and/or Cool-down exercises for health reasons.

The following exercises are helpful to release tension:

  • Avoid remaining in an uncomfortable or strained position for longer periods of time
  • Tilt head to the R – center head – tilt head to the L – try to touch ear to shoulder while keeping shoulder depressed (down) – 8-16 repetitions
  • Rotate shoulder slowly forward – 8-16 repetitions
  • Rotate shoulders slowly backward – 8-16 repetitions
  • Alternate shoulder rotation – 16 repetitions – forward and backward
  • Pull up R shoulder to R ear – lower – 8-16 repetitions – pull up L shoulder to L ear – lower shoulder – 8-16 repetitions – or alternate shoulder

 

Exercise #1

Exercise #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Stand, feet slightly apart or sit upright on a chair, feet flat on floor and slightly apart – place both hands on one side at the back part of the head (on bottom, just above the onset of the neck) – massage neck muscles softly forward and downward toward the chest and ribcage – feel around for small knots of muscles, which cause tension – use two fingers of one hand and palm of opposite hand and apply pressure against the knot[s] until pain ceases – repeat on opposite side
  2. Stand upright, feet slightly apart – pull in stomach – place L hand overhead onto R side of the head – tilt head slowly to L side while stretching R arm at the same time downward until feeling a slight pull in the neck and shoulder girdle – hold 30 seconds – release – repeat on other side – repeat exercise 6-8 times per day

References:

Das Goldene Blatt (2017, December 13). Gesundheit. Übung der Woche. Löst Verspannungen und lindert Nackenschmerz [Health. Exercise of the week. Reduces tension and alleviates neck pain], #51, p. 23.

Das Goldene Blatt (2018, April 18). Gesundheit. Übung der Woche. Nacken-Akupressur befreit vom Schmerz. [Health. Exercise of the week. Neck- acupuncture relieves pain], #15, p. 24.

Die Aktuelle (2018, April 18). Herr Doctor was kann das sein? Weshalb habe ich ständig Nackenschmerzen. [Doctor what can this be? Why do I have constant neck pain?], #18, p. 61.

Pictures:

Das Goldene Blatt (2017, December 13, #51, p. 23).

Das Goldene Blatt (2018, April 18, #15, p. 24).

Positive Impact of Multi-Sport Experience – Part 4

Previous articles centered on burnout and dropout, stress, and injuries linked to early specialization. While the topic has been a hot discussion for years, it seemingly has had little impact! Parents and coaches still embrace the ‘win at all cost’ attitude and push kids early on despite existing data or expert opinions and well-reviewed evidence highlighting the pitfalls of the approach. Researchers pursue the topic once again due to significant consequences.

According to present research, it is very beneficial for younger athletes to participate in various sports and learn from and interact with different coaches. Multi-sport experiences enhance children’s movement repertoire and fundamental movement patterns if teachers and coaches follow guidelines of physical literacy (ABCs, agility, balance, coordination, and speed).

For example, I trained and competed in Germany during my youth years in the so-called Jahn Sechs Kampf1 [Jahn Six-event competition] consisting of 2-Aquatic events  (selected 50 m Breaststroke, and Forward Pike Dive on 1m board); 2-Athletic events (selected 75m Sprint, and Long Jump), 1-Gymnastics event (selected Vaulting), and 1- Rhythmic Sportive event (selected Rope). The competition was held as a local, state, regional, national event, and included the ‘Deutsches Turn Fest’ (German Gymnastics Festival, comprising gymnastics, rhythmic sportive, athletics, and swimming), and the so-called Gymnastrada2 [Open International Event, held every 3-4 years].

The German Sport System

Jugend Leistungs Sport Abzeichen in Gold [Youth Sport Brooch in Gold]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The German sport system also has an annual sport participation event, called ‘Sport für Alle’ [Sport for All] whereby participants of all ages accumulate points based on fixed national standards for the ‘Leistungs Sport Abzeichen’ [Sport Achievement Badge]3 in various sport activities: run, jump, throw, swimming (choice event), various gymnastics skills, biking for specific distance, and hiking specific routes. To start up, one can earn a crest/broche/badge in Bronze, then move to Silver, and then Gold (in that order) for ‘Jugend’ [Youth] and ‘Senioren’ [Seniors = over 18 years]. Each can be repeated as many times as desired in consecutive years in the respective color: Bronze 1, 2, 3, etc.; Silver 1, 2, 3, etc.; and Gold 1, 2, 3, etc. That specific number is engraved at the bottom [shown: mine – Jugend Gold]. My father participated into his 80s, earning Senioren Gold 25 (25 repeated years), a true representation of ‘Sport for Life.’

Schools also participate nationwide in prescribed individual and team sport activities, Bundes Jugend Spiele4 [Federation Youth Games]. The school with the highest point total is granted a reception by the German President, and individual participants with highest point total receive the certificate from the German President. I have a box full of these (shown below), and I am very proud of my achievements based on multi-sport athleticism!

Inside – National Certificate President Theodore Heuss’s Signature

Front – National Certificate

    

                    

 

                                      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moreover, most German athletes participate in what is referred to as ‘Ausgleichs Sport’ [several translation can be used here: doing another sport as equalizing activity, or compensation for, sport balancing, whereby one engages in another sport at the recreational, club, partial or competitive or seasonal level]. For example, my brother, 3-time Olympic captain for German Ice hockey, played Summer Club Soccer, while German elite swimmer Sandra Völker participated in recreational Volleyball as her ‘Ausgleichs Sport.’

The Argument for Developmental versus Chronological Age

Istvan Balyi, leading Canadian Sport For Life CS4L expert and architect of the Long-term Athlete Development (LTAD), presented his research at the Canadian Summit in Gatineau, Quebec, January 23-25, 2018. He strongly disapproves of the current training philosophy evidenced in North American age group programming and the traditional competition format, superimposed by Sports Federations based on chronological rather than developmental ages. He calls for optimal training and competition preparation, developmentally appropriate and meaningful competition, and optimal recovery, which takes into consideration early, average, and late maturing athletes. The chart shows the range of boys and girls based on chronological versus developmental age.

Schloder, M.E. (2017). Growth and Development. NCCP Supplementary Lecture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Height Variations among 7-8 year old Boys and Girls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture of boys basketball team showing the height difference between each of them

Height differences between adolescent male athletes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Height difference between four adolescent female swimmers

Height Difference of 13-14 year old female Athletes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summary of Early Specialization Series Parts 2, 3, and 4

  1. Athletes emerge more balanced and well rounded within the developmental ‘athlete-centered’ program of Fun, skills, and goal achievement. It increases their chances of reaching elite levels in their sport, according to sport psychologists and sport sociologists.
  2. Athletes who try a number of sports and specialize at older ages reach higher performance levels than those who specialize early, and more importantly are less likely to experience burnout because they do not develop the typical ‘perfectionist driven’ attitude ever so present in early specialization programs.
  3. Athletes who specialize later also develop better movement patterns and decision-making skills because of the range of activities that require various cognitive and physical functions.
  4. Being in various sport situations keeps athletes mentally refreshed and more open-minded.
  5. Foremost, the more sports children and youth engage at younger ages in so-called ‘sampling or smorgasboard’ activities, the easier it is for them to select the one sport best suited to their mental makeup and body composition in order to specialize in that sport later on. Additionally, ‘sampling’ various sports and activities provides opportunities to develop fundamental movement skills within a variety of environments, and allows athletes to become more athletically diverse and adaptable.
  6. Athletes pursuing a number of sport experiences are most likely remaining in sports for longer period of times and stay ‘active for life.’
  7. Baker, Côté and Abernathy (2003) demonstrate a high correlation between an increase in sports sampled as a youth and the chances of succeeding and becoming elite athletes (cited in I. Balyi, R. Wade, & C. Higgs, 2013, pp. 53-54). Baker et al. also show that reaching excellence and elite status in a single-sport training system is not the vital factor in determining success; however, developing physical literacy and specializing later is.

References:

Baker, J., CôtéJ., & Abernathy, B. (2003). Sport-specific training, deliberate practice and the development of expertise in team ball sports. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 15, 12-25.

Balyi, I., Way, R., & Higgs, C. (2013). Long-term athlete development. A guide to developing a philosophy of sport for life; training frameworks, a consistently successful organization. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Bompa, T. (1995). From childhood to champion athlete. Toronto, ON: Veritas.

Coakley, J. (2000). Sport in society: Issues and controversies (6th ed.) Toronto, ON: Times Mirror/Mosby.

DiFiori, J.P. (2002). Overuse injuries in young athletes: An overview. Athletic Therapy Today, 7(6), 25-29.

Gould, D., Udry, E., Tuffey, S., & Loehr, J. (1996). Burnout in competitive junior tennis players: A quantitative psychological assessment. The Sport Psychologist, 10, 322-340.

Hill, G. (2009). Sport specialization: Causes and concerns. [PowerPoint slides]. Presented at the Long-term Athlete Development Conference of the Utah Athletic Foundation. Salt Lake City, UT.

Klika, B. (2018). Early sport specialization: Getting them to listen. Retrieved April 19, 2018, from http://iyca.org/early-sport-specialization-getting-them-to-listen/?inf_ contact_key=d7b16a7aefda94e3123209fae92a894930bf5ff352ad8d103b6630ba600eba02

Sanderson, L. (1989). Growth and development considerations for design of training plans for young athletes. Sports, 10(2).

Schwarz, C. (May 17, 2017). Hockey players who can’t catch. The Calgary Herald, B8.

Touretski, G. (1993). Physiological development of the young swimmer. A rational for the long-term preparation of the young swimmer. Paper presented at the Australian Institute for Sport. Canberra, Australia.

Weineck, J. (2010). Optimales Training. Leistungsphysiologische Trainingslehre unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Kinder und Jugendtrainings [Optimal training. Physiological performance within training theory with special consideration consideration for children and youth training]. Balingen, Germany: Spitta Verlag.

Notes:

Dr. Jürgen Weineck, PhD, Dr. Med., Emeritus. Sport Institute for Sport Science and Sport. University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

1 Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778 – 1852), German gymnastics educator and nationalist. He is known as Turnvater Jahn, roughly meaning “father of gymnastics.”

2 Gymnastrada: Various performance-based sport events provide the opportunity to celebrate movement and physical activity in a non-competitive environment while capturing the true essence of the ‘Gymnastics for All’ and ‘Active for Life’ philosophies of sport and recreation.

3 Sport Achievement Badge (German: Deutsches Sportabzeichen (DSA) – decoration      from German Olympic Sports of the Federal Republic of Germany – German Sports Badge Test carried out primarily in Germany

4 ‘Bundes Jugend Spiele’ by Schools [Federation Youth Games]

5 Pictures, courtesy Istvan Balyi

    Balyi, I. (2018). Long-term athlete development. Gatineau, QC: Canadian Summit. Canadian Sport for Life (CS4L). January 23-25, 2018.

Websites and Forums on the Topic of Early Specialization:

http://www.theprovince.com/news/local+news/fear+greed+broken+dreams+early+sports+specialization/17236038/story.html

https://www.trackie.com/track-and-field/Forum/early-sports-specialization-is-eroding-youth-sports/16485/?comment_id=MAIN&quote=1

http://www.worldfootynews.com/article.php/20180402211733509

https://www.paradigmsports.ca/its-only-a-game-mom/

Tip of the Month – April 2018

Coach Monika says…

 

Numerous people in the past stated that I have been “light years ahead of time” – something which was not always to my advantage as the same people also called me “crazy” for my novel coaching approach. The March Newsletter dealt with the impact of posture on sport performance, and incorporating modified Ballet into your sport program – a trend that has been increasing with popularity over time. In fact, there was a recent report in the Calgary Herald (March 31, p. G 8), “Time to raise the barre on your fitness routine”, about that very subject.

Am I still crazy? I used modified Ballet, Yoga, and Pilates years ago when the fitness industry was not even aware of these activities. I released two dual DVDs in 2016, Ballet for Swimmers: Modified Exercises for Cross-training and Ballet for Athletes: Modified Exercises for Cross-training. The swim DVD links modified ballet exercises to swim strokes, starts, and turns; while the Athlete DVD deals with various individual and team sports.

So, why is the fitness industry just recently putting emphasis on the benefits of barre training? Here are excerpts from the Calgary Herald, 2018:

…You may think you’re doing a more graceful and slower paced workout, but guaranteed you’ll be sweating, and your thigh muscles will be twitching while doing a ballet barre class. Combining ballet, Pilates and Yoga, barre classes have exploded, taking a page from diligent ballet dancers who have the gams to show for their dedication…

…Barre is used for many of the exercises that isolate specific muscle groups, and you will use it for balance or to grab on to just when you think you can’t do one more plié or squat (sometimes with the added challenge of a medicine ball squeezed between your thighs)…

…After a couple of classes, you’ll feel you’re well on your way to a firmer derriere, thighs and calves. The upper half of your body isn’t forgotten in the hour-long workouts. There’s also ‘Ab’ work, hand weights for triceps and biceps and shoulders. You will feel like you’ve worked just about every muscle in your body when you’re done…

Coach Monika suggests putting new life into your training program and having your athletes try ballet to change the daily routine and maintain motivation.

Reference:

Monforton, L. (2018, March 31). Beyond the everyday gym. Time to raise the barre on your fitness routine. The Calgary Herald, p. G8.

Why Us ?

Shape Young Athletes
By Having FUN!

INTRODUCING:

Physical Literacy For Children And Youth
Through Fun, Fitness And Fundamentals

Available NOW! – Instant Download or 2-Disk Set

Watch the preview video below!

You will be astonished over the athletic accomplishments of these young athletes’ strength, flexibility, balance, etc.

Click here to purchase your copy today!

 

 

 

 Dr. Monika Schloder Welcomes You To The Home of CoachingBest

Your one-stop for Coaching Tips, Training, and Information for the Athletic Coach

Years of teaching and coaching experience in several sports have provided me with the ability to understand the physical, mental, and emotional requirements for developing beginner to elite level athlete in several sports. The ‘knack’ to analyze sport movement, in essence, detect errors and then develop creative corrections and drills to improve, maximize, and optimize performance – no matter the sport – is one of my greatest assets.

Dr. Monika Scloder, Summer Swim Camp- Turku, Finland

Professional Activities:

  • DVD Series in Swimming and Athletic Training
  • Learning Facilitator, Canadian National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), having educated over 24,000 coaches to date
  • Certified Alberta NCCP Coach Developer (2016) and Certified Coach Mentor (2017)
  • Speaker at International Congresses, Coaching Symposiums, and World Clinics
  • Master Coach in Residence, 1991-2004, for the Los Angeles based 84 Legacy of the Games (former Amateur Athletic Foundation or AAF), developing programs for Inner City Minority Youth Education and Leadership
  • Author of Coaching Manuals in Swimming and Soccer
  • Co-author “Coaching Athletes: A Foundation for Success”

 

Honors:

  • Alberta 2008 Coach of the Year
  • Recipient of 14 International Teaching and Coaching Awards
  • 3M Teaching Fellowship Award for Outstanding Teaching at Canadian Universities
  • Recipient of Teaching Excellence Awards, University of Calgary
  • At CoachingBest.com We offer sport consulting and coaching education to organizations worldwide with an emphasis on current issues, performance analysis, and performance improvement. Visit our Website and ‘Tips of the Week’ for current topics and coaching suggestions.

 

At CoachingBest.com We offer sport consulting and coaching education to organizations worldwide with an emphasis on current issues, performance analysis, and performance improvement.

Visit our Website and ‘Tips of the Month’ for current topics and coaching suggestions.

 

 


 

Dr. Schloder has developed a series of Training DVD’s to help Coaches and Athletes

 

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ASCA Workshop Conference and Presentation

Happenings from November

With Coach Rebecca Atchley – Dr. Schloder was an External Committee Member for Rebeca’s Masters Project Dr. Schloder’s Workshop Presentation

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Conference Photos

Happenings from September

Latest Happenings!!

 Dr. Monika Schloder at the ASCA World Clinic for Swimming, Jacksonville, Florida, Sept 8, 2014 Presenting at the 4-hour Work shop “Dry-land School for Age Group Swimmers” Coaches participate in her workshops… they don’t just sit!

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Back Arch Demo

Coach Schloder in Istanbul, Turkey Swim Camp , June 9-15

Underneath the swimmer to demonstrate the back arch position after the Back Crawl start. Not too many coaches can do this perfectly!

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Developing Physical Literacy

This highly acclaimed presentation was given by Dr. Schloder at the Canadian Sport for Life Summit (CS4L), which will be available as a movie version. Watch for the up-coming DVD: ‘Physical Activities for Children and Youth. Fundamental Movement Skills in the Pursuit of Excellence and Well-being.’

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4 comments

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  1. Michèle Boutin

    Dear Dr. Schloder,

    We are a small competitive swimming club in Beaconsfield, Quebec, Canada.
    We are interested in purchasing your DVD+Booklet called Fly Away but it is not available on your online shop.
    Could you please let me know how we could purchase it?

    Best regards,

    Michèle Boutin
    Beaconsfield Bluefins Swim Club
    http://www.bluefins.ca

    1. coach

      have you emailed me?

  2. Augusto Acosta

    I love your work!

  3. Kim Cox

    Super new front page on your website, very informative.

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The Secret of Healthy Sitting Posture

As a follow-up to the June Tip of the Month – the impact of incorrect sitting – Surgeon Dr. Gerd Schnack from the Sport and Prevention Center in Zug, Switzerland informs us about impingement on the neck, spine, hips, skeleton, joints, and related muscle groups. Humans are made for walking and running, not sitting, according …

Read more

Tip of the Month – June

Coach Monika says… Correct and Incorrect Sitting – Things to Bear in Mind Ever watch people in shopping malls or just walking about on the street, busy with their ‘tech gadgets’ oblivious to their surroundings? Medical reports have now identified serious health issues associated with the typical slumped posture adopted while scrolling. I am concerned …

Read more